In a Vase on Monday: Test Tube Baby

Time and circumstances dictated that today’s vase should be just the bare necessities, which is what you have here in more ways than one.

I love to see the pared-down simplicity of colchicum at this time of year, naked without their leaves (which appear in spring), and especially before the weather turns their party dresses into bedraggled rags, so after wordlessly admiring my C ‘Water Lily’ on Wednesday I determined to give it another chance to shine in my next Monday vase. They can have surprisingly long, albeit delicate, stems (this one was about 5″, just under 13cm) so a vase required both a narrow neck and sufficient height to display the flower above it, and I did not think of my box of test tubes, snapped up from eBay, immediately – but I am glad I did, as together with the planned choice of prop, it produced a very neat title!

If you have the time and inclination to find something to pick from your garden today, then please do so, sharing it with us if you like by leaving the usual links to and from this post.

 

This entry was posted in bulbs, corms and tubers, Gardening, Gardens, In a Vase on Monday and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to In a Vase on Monday: Test Tube Baby

  1. pbmgarden says:

    I can always count on a smile from you Cathy! Masterful title and a perfect container for your beautiful colchicum. You’ve captured a lot of movement in the closeup image. Have a good week and thanks for hosting.
    https://pbmgarden.blog/2020/09/14/in-a-vase-on-monday-dahlias-in-blue-vase/

  2. Hi Cathy, you do have a way of coming up with the most apt title. Unlike me – I struggle.. The test tube is the right container for that one perfect bloom. Here’s the link to my vase for this week: https://silverscrappers.blogspot.com/2020/09/in-vase-on-monday-roses-asters-herbs.html

  3. the running wave says:

    The nakedness of the autumn crocus is always so obvious when you see the lovely lavender colours coming up all by themselves at this time of year! They seem to glow without the distraction of surrounding leaves! Your bloom is very glowing and glamorous! Not sure I have ever seen a double one before. Very lovely! Amanda https://therunningwave.blogspot.com/2020/09/a-simple-vase-on-monday.html

    • Cathy says:

      And these blowsy ones are even more amazing! This is the only variety I have and admittedly once it gets rained on I sometimes I wishes they weren’t quite as blowsy as they are!

  4. I thought it was a water lily. Beautiful, did not know Colchicums were even double or purple…gorgeous and love the prop. I have a simple arrangement today as well. https://theshrubqueen.com/2020/09/14/in-a-vase-on-monday-cattleyas-on-the-rocks/

  5. Pingback: In A Vase on Monday – Creamy White | Eliza Waters

  6. Eliza Waters says:

    Love it! πŸ™‚
    My vase this week can be the bridal bouquet and yours the subsequent result. πŸ˜‰ https://wp.me/p3O3z4-2A6

  7. krispeterson100 says:

    Your post put a smile on my face, Cathy!. I love the Colchicum. I used to see the bulbs in bloom in local garden centers every fall but, for some reason, that hasn’t been the case for years. Yours is a beauty and the baby makes the perfect prop. Here’s my post: https://krispgarden.blogspot.com/2020/09/in-vase-on-monday-dahlias-dahlias-and.html

    Thanks for hosting!

  8. Anna says:

    Another brilliant post title Cathy! I don’t know how you do it. The colchicum is such a striking colour and hopefully should be spared any damaging rain over the next few days. A definite star. My post is here : https://greentapestry.blogspot.com/2020/09/iavom-mellowyellow.html

  9. Pingback: In a Vase on Monday: Pink September | Words and Herbs

  10. Cathy says:

    That is a lovely sight Cathy. I don’t grow them as the leaves are so poisonous, but I do love them. And what a great prop and appropriate title too! Here is my vase today. Thanks, as always.
    https://wordsandherbs.wordpress.com/2020/09/14/in-a-vase-on-monday-pink-september/

    • Cathy says:

      The leaves are poisonous? 😲 Aargh, I didn’t know that and will check it out so I can take appropriate measures in the future…Thanks for alerting me, Cathy

      • Cathy says:

        They are similar to wild garlic leaves and apparently a handful of people die every year in Germany by mistaking them! I can recognise the difference, but they are very similar!

        • Cathy says:

          Ah yes, if they are growing in the wild I can see how that might be a problem – although they don’t smell of garlic, do they?

          • Cathy says:

            No, but if you are surrounded by the smell of garlic while picking wild garlic you might not notice a stray leaf… My neighbour grew his under a Magnolia tree and warned me that autumn crocus were in a nearby bed, so I was aware of the problem and could be careful, but autumn crocus grow in the wild on the edge of woodland here too and many people have no idea it is there.

  11. Pingback: In a Vase on Monday on Scrap Happy Tuesday | Wild Daffodil

  12. Annette says:

    Intriguing title, Cathy, which gets me thinking! πŸ˜‰ Yes, I love colchicum too and just spotted the first by the side of the road that leads to our house. In Switzerland we have masses of them in the meadows, an awesome sight. Hope you and the Golfer are in good shape and enjoying the fab late summer. Love to you both xx

    • Cathy says:

      Seeing them in the wild must be an amazing sight, Annette. We are well, thank you, and just back from a trip to my Mum’s – strange to be travelling all those miles after sticking to the locality for six months… Good to be back and enjoying the garden again, where there is still much in the way of colour

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