Six on Saturday: Frost

With temperatures forecasted to drop to at least -2°C last night a frost was inevitable, so my camera accompanied me on the first ramble of the day to capture the result. It certainly made for a pretty scene, exemplified by a bog-standard sedum (above) and Nandina ‘Obsessed’ (below):

Black mondo grass, Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’, was barely recognisable after Jack Frost had visited:

…and perhaps the blooms on Viburnum bodnantense ‘Dawn’ are regretting appearing so early:

Structure in the garden will always be highlighted by frost, including stems and seedheads left in the borders, like this allium:

…and this metallic cow parsley in the woodland edge border:

For other Six on Saturday photos please visit host Jon’s blog, many of which I guess may be equally frosty. Meanwhile, I have happily tolerated today’s bitterly cold temperatures, safe in the knowledge that I finally got round to bubblewrapping the greenhouse yesterday (note also the useful hooks, recently added to tidy up the canes used for tomatoes and early sweet peas):

This entry was posted in garden structure, Gardens, greenhouse, Six on Saturday, Winter. Bookmark the permalink.

29 Responses to Six on Saturday: Frost

  1. jenanita01 says:

    That allium is stunning…

    • Cathy says:

      It is so pretty but I knew I had to be out early to photograph the frost before temperatures went up – not that they were going to go more than 4 degrees!

  2. Cathy the sedum with ice is divine. The allium is an ice sculpture, I love it. The metallic cow parsley is exceptional. It seems a lie as ice makes such wonderful and capricious forms in plants even if it kills them. I am very glad that you have finally finished insulating the Greenhouse inside: I really like hooks to hold long cane rods, they are very useful. Greetings from Margarita.

  3. bcparkison says:

    Hmmm. You put bubble wrap on the inside….how do you attach it please and why.

    • Cathy says:

      The bubblewrap helps insulate it, Beth, and you can buy ‘alliplugs’ which hold it by clipping into the frame. I also use little ‘bulldog clips’ for edges. It does make a little difference, and g/h heaters add sufficient warmth to bring temps up to about 5 degrees C

  4. Eliza Waters says:

    Lovely frost photos, esp. the allium!

  5. Pretty frosty photos, I haven’t seen any in years. Love it. Thank you.

  6. Kris P says:

    Frost is pretty but I’m nonetheless happy it’s something I don’t have to worry about.

  7. janesmudgeegarden says:

    Such pretty photos, especially the Allium. It’s like a fairy wand!

  8. Linda Casper says:

    Reminds me of Narnia – not that I’ve been there!

  9. You certainly are a hardy perennial Cathy. It was certainly rather nippy out there yesterday and perhaps even colder today. The allium looks as if it has been decorated with sparkle for the forthcoming festive season. I like your natty cane storage idea.

  10. Jim Stephens says:

    Your glasshouse with its bubble wrap got me thinking about thermal screens, as used extensively in large commercial glasshouses. Like a curtain drawn across at night, then off again by day. Even an imperfect one would likely save on heating costs. Bubble wrap cuts out a lot of light when the light levels are already low, in winter. Hmmmm.

  11. Oh my goodness, these are among the prettiest frost photos I think I’ve seen! You are very organized and prepared with your greenhouse.

  12. cavershamjj says:

    Great photos! There was no frost to speak of last week, the temperature flirted with freezing but never really got there. This morning is a different matter…

  13. Jackie Knight says:

    So very beautiful, thanks for the pictures, that allium is a stunner.

  14. tonytomeo says:

    I used to think that Heavenly bamboo (nandina) would not tolerate much frost where winters are cooler, but was surprised to see how well it was doing in Olympia in Washington. It is quite tough.

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