Help! (I need somebody)

help not just anybody, but someone who can tell me what the above plant is (and why it is growing in the streamside grass). One of the advantages (at least it seems like an advantage) of having planted about 99.99% of the plants that are in the garden is that I have a pretty good idea of what every plant is, even if the label has been lost and not been replaced. More often than not I even have a good idea of when and where it came from – but this one? It is sort of camassia/hyacinth like in appearance but I have never managed to get camassias to grow and this is too short (about 30cms) and the wrong colour anyway. Once one of you good and knowledgeable people has identified it I will know immediately if I was the culprit  or if there has been a case of immaculate conception – if it was me I cannot imagine why I planted it here and why it hasn’t got a label…

IMG_5045There is so much to be done in the garden but I have been trying to balance keeping on top of it with other seasonal commitments and watching the Chelsea coverage (a day behind). After a wet Monday, the weather has been lovely making it ideal for planting out more of the dozens of seedlings into the still moist soil – but I am way behind! Meanwhile I have again snapped up two of these pots (below) from Aldi (stuffed with plants and great value at £4.99) which are destined for the ice cream containers (in need TLC before being planted up) just like the last two years where they have flowered all summer. I shall be hot-footing it back to Aldi tomorrow add to my vase collection (sorry, too good to resist!) so please don’t snap them all up before I get there!

help2

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9 Responses to Help! (I need somebody)

  1. croftgarden says:

    How about Ornithogalum nutans – Star of Bethlehem?

  2. Well, it’s … interesting. Doesn’t seem to have a stem, either.

  3. rickii says:

    I try to turn off my inner editor when I am wandering around the garden and just enjoy it as is. That’s easier said than done, with so many obvious chores everywhere I look. That last pot (is it metal?) is a real find. Vases call out to me from every garage sale I pass.

  4. Christina says:

    My first thought was Ornithogalum nutans as Croft Gardens above but it doesn’t look exactly like it, that opens into a very white star, hence the common name. Sorry I can’t be more helpful.

  5. No idea… I read in a recent copy of The Garden that one female professional gardener, whenever asked the name of a plant she doesn”t know, always states with great confidence, “Ah yes, that’s an Anonymous vulgaris”.

  6. AnnetteM says:

    I am sure you will catch up Cathy – I am very behind too. I have all sorts of things flopping everywhere because they need staking and still lots of bedding plants to put in pots. I hope you get your plant identified – I have something fairly similar, but I don’t know what it is either so no help there. I did plant it though, but long before I kept labels.

  7. Anna says:

    I can’t put a name to the mystery plant but it sounds as if you’ve got some good clues already. I can’t get to Aldi until Saturday at the earliest so there should be some vases left for you Cathy 🙂 Those containers look like a bargain buy.

  8. My vote is for Ornithogalum nutans. Google search it and view all the images. It can be invasive and is known to show up in places where it never was before and you know you didn’t plant it. I rather like it… And after all, immaculate conception, star in the east, star of Bethlehem, etc. Heh heh.

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