Garden Bloggers Foliage Day: a Multi-Stemmed Approach

IMG_0869It was reading other blogs this time last year that led me to introduce plants for winter interest into the pots on the paved area behind the house, and I am glad I did – for the cornus have already justified their existence in the smaller three lead effect pots. Although small when they were planted in February they (C sericea ‘Flaviramea’, sanguinea ’Midwinter Fire’ and alba ‘Sibirica) have all put on enough growth to make a visible impact in their first season, their bare stems positively glowing. The larger pot has the Viburnum x bodnantense ‘Dawn’, bought for the same reason, and which has displayed a ‘win some, lose some’ approach to its buds so far this winter.

Rambling specifically to take photos for this foliage day meme, kindly hosted despite the absence from her own garden by Christina, I was struck yet again by the important contribution foliage makes at this time of year, the structure and form of many stalwarts really standing out within the relative starkness of the garden and highlighting different shades, textures and patterns of green. It was a joy to observe them, and although I have included Cyclamen hederifolium and Arum italicum ‘Marmoratum’ in the montage below it is undoubtedly the ever-present greenery of ferns and ivies that knit the whole garden together, and I love them all for this reason. To see what foliage other bloggers are enjoying do follow the link to find other contributors to this meme.

GBFD.Dec13

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14 Responses to Garden Bloggers Foliage Day: a Multi-Stemmed Approach

  1. Christina says:

    I see what you mean! Our posts are very similar! Looking at my own garden and the ones I’ve been visiting I am more and more aware that flowers are just the icing on the cake and without the cake itself, would be very sad indeed!

  2. pbmgarden says:

    You have an interesting assortment of textures represented.

  3. rusty duck says:

    I shall be a year behind you, but I’m looking at dogwoods for winter colour too now. The Arum is beautiful.

    • Cathy says:

      I need to make sure I prune the dogwoods properly to make sure I maximise the potential of the stems – even this size they stand out, don’t they?

  4. Look at all the foliage….nice to see it.

  5. bittster says:

    Nice rage of greens for this time of year, the ferns are so interesting!

    • Cathy says:

      Thanks – most of my ferns are (or were!) labelled but I had too many other things to do than root around in the soil to have a look! They are indeed lovely.

  6. wellywoman says:

    I love the cornus in pots. I don’t have the space for them in the garden and that would be such a good alternative.

    • Cathy says:

      They are quite big pots too and had been really under-utilised, so it seemed the ideal solution as I see them every time I look out of the kitchen windows. It’s certainly one way of finding a space – as long as there is space for the pot in the first place, of course!

  7. As and when I get the patio sorted I will be tempeted to do likewise, those pots work really well, and relatively esy to move them elsewhere when no longer quite as interesting. My “midwinter fire” got moved about a foot to make a path to the newly planted pear tree, and it catches the sun even better in its new location, so in future years will hopefully be a really good contributer. I have a growing list of ferns to plant around my enormous treestump once I have dealt with the bindeweed infestation, can’t beat a good tapestry of evergreen foliage as a backbone to a garden.

    • Cathy says:

      Ooh, that bindweed infestation – I must admit it is my least favourite weed, but fortunately only appears in one bed and has never got to flower, so I suppose it is being controlled. Have you got a time schedule for the demise of yours? Glad your ‘Midwinter Fire’ is settling in after the move – definitely a lovely plant to have.

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