Easter Uprising: End of Month View, March

The end of March has rather taken me by surprise, even though I knew it was coming – perhaps because we have been so preoccupied with the weather recently. I realise that much of this end of month view (is not going to look very different from the last two or three to the distant viewer, but here at HQ it is a different story. Despite the weather and the lingering patches of snow the early spring plants continue to rebel against March’s harsh army of wintry cold and easterly winds, fighting to retain their rightful place in our expectations of this time of year in the garden, Everywhere you look there are new shoots appearing and buds swelling, with progress to be seen on a daily basis – one of the joys of my daily rambles for this blog is the ability to chronicle these minute changes, with recent posts paying homage to the appearance of many old and new favourites. Spring has taken up arms to banish Winter for good for this season and it has been a hard fought battle!

DSCN1605The buds on the viburnum in the big square pot on the paved area above are gradually unfurling their pinkness, and on several chilly days I have pressed my nose close to them and cupped my hands around to try and detect their anticipated aroma, so far without success. The magnolia beyond the pots is recovering from its severe haircut last summer and I am keeping a close watch on the swelling buds. The clematis montana which climbs through it is also posed to strut its stuff. Below, the stream side is brightening up as the Tête-à-Tête finally begin to make an impact:

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The woodland above is hiding its treasures from the casual viewer, but camouflaged within it are clumps of primrose and hundreds of emergent wood anemones shoots. The bluebells and wild garlic have been building on their early growth with a view to flowering in a month or two. The borders below are similarly home to the as yet discreet efforts of species tulips and allium, with numerous geranium and other herbaceous perennials preparing for a later show of colour and I hope to fill the many gaps in the haphazard planting later in the year.

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It will be interesting to see how the climbers on the clematis colonnade above establish themselves this year and whether any of them need to be replaced; there are certainly gaps in the heuchera planting at the foot of the Acer griseum that need to be addressed. Not so in the woodland edge border, featured in numerous recent posts, which has been and still is full of glorious hellebores and late snowdrops, resisting the efforts of the recent snow to quell their enthusiasm.

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DSCN1615DSCN1616The left and right hot borders above are already displaying much leafy growth on last year’s planting of many new perennials and are building up strength for colour later – perhaps I could try and introduce spring colour to add some interest in the interim? On the left the veg beds look fantastic after my late clearing and digging, the cold and heavy frosts having levelled the surfaces and broken down some of the unraked lumps of soil, and in the greenhouse there are early signs of activity that have been absent in recent years.

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The blue and white border is devoid of any blue and white still, but there is plenty of promise for later in the year although the planting probably needs a bit of reorganisation once everything is in full flow. The rose garden below is preparing to begin its first full season in its new location and looks much neater after I spent some time weeding and removing pebbles a couple of weeks ago.

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Recent work to replace the lychgate is virtually complete, just requiring a gate and the tying-in of the honeysuckle that clambered over it, and the front extension to the shed displays its intended usage of timber storage as well as unintended accumulation of clutter.

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Almost back at the house, the species snowdrops border awaits a decision on plants for later interest (the answer probably being geraniums) but in the meantime the snowdrops have finished and the pots are begging for some colour. It will be a few months before the pots acquire this status, but I shall do my best – at least there will be rather more colour around at the end of next month, if not in the pots. I am grateful to Helen at Patient Gardener for hosting this EOMV, thus encouraging me and many others to monitor our gardens monthly – do visit her site and the links to many other gardens.

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12 Responses to Easter Uprising: End of Month View, March

  1. Holleygarden says:

    You have been doing a lot of work, and it sounds like you and your garden are ready for spring to burst forth! I love the structure of your gardens, and can only imagine all the changes that will be taking place over the next month!

    • Cathy says:

      Thanks for your positive comments, as it can be hard to look at it objectively sometimes. I changed such a lot of it last year so it was very much a time of transition, but I am hoping the revamped areas begin to gel this year

  2. Lea says:

    Anticipation!
    So many plants just ready to burst forth!
    Happy Easter!
    Lea
    Lea’s Menagerie

  3. A little bit of spring and it will be amazing to see the difference in your garden. I do really like the elements you are using in your design strategy.

    • Cathy says:

      Thanks Charlie – the Golfer suggests you tell me what my design strategy is! That’s not fair, actually, because in my revamp I did have an overall plan of most of the layout, although my planting is a bit haphazard within that as I was utilising old plants and bringing in new ones but without any planting ‘plan’. We’ll see how it turns out!

  4. easygardener says:

    I must say your garden is looking much tidier than mine. You are correct about most of the changes this month require the gardener to look closely – excepting the arrival of the Daffodils – they are hard to miss at the moment.

    • Cathy says:

      Thanks – I spent a couple of afternoons before our recent snow sweeping up the last of the leaves and bits of twig and removing some of the more obvious weeds from the beds, which was good timing because it does now look tidier than it has for a long time 🙂

  5. a lovely walk round your garden Cathy, you seem to have a lot going on despite the cold, glad your snow has almost gone, it kind of fasinates me how you have divided your garden up into so many different areas, btw I like the new bench, Frances

  6. Looks like spring is really coming along in your garden. I love all your brick paths.

    • Cathy says:

      Thanks Jason – and there was some real warmth in the sun yesterday afternoon, a taster of what is hopefully to come!

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